In the News

It’s always a tricky and risky proposition to adapt a beloved film into something else, but that’s what’s happening at the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, where “Finding Neverland” is being transformed into a musical.
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Paulus’s mantra is to “expand the boundaries of theater,” and this production is part of that goal. “It is set in 1904, but it is keyed in to Barrie’s imagination, and the imagination is timeless,” she says.
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Best known for his Tony-nominated turn in Broadway's Newsies and his role on the NBC series Smash, Jordan will star as Peter Pan creator J.M. Barrie.... The story follows Barrie's developing relationship with the family that inspired his most famous fictional character.
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“It's exhausting,” says Jordan. “It's demanding in all sorts of ways. The first act is physically demanding. The second act is more emotionally demanding. And then you figure that I'm onstage for almost the entire show – I leave for only about seven minutes total.”
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Contemporary audiences will have the chance to experience some of that wonder this summer when the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) recaptures the spirit of the boy who would never grow up in its premiere of “Finding Neverland.” The new musical, about the real-life genesis of Barrie’s groundbreaking work, runs from July 23 through Sept. 28.
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The artistic director of the American Repertory Theater thinks theater should be more like a rock concert.
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Graham shares what audiences can expect from the highly anticipated A.R.T. production.
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“All the Way,” a play by Robert Schenkkan that the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge staged last fall, went on to Broadway and last night scooped up Tony awards for best play and for actor Bryan Cranston, who portrayed President Lyndon Baines Johnson and his efforts to convince Congress to enact the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
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Fanciful, mysterious and full of cheerily broad comedy, this is a "Tempest" that will give equal pleasure to seasoned playgoers and novices who quake in their boots at the mention of iambic pentameter. It is—in a word—magical.
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It’s a telling experience when you wake up the morning after seeing a play, and it’s still there with you, its spectacles, sounds and surprises pulsing in your mind hours after the theater emptied.
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