In the News

With his retro-look (think Bette Page) and basso rasp with which he cracks jokes and sings an eclectic mix of songs, from pop to jazz to rock, Arias is a true original and legendary drag pioneer.
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‘The Garden’ is an intimate, immersive show for tiny audiences.
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There are lots of conversations in performing arts circles these days about finding ways to expand audiences, both in terms of their demographic makeup and their sheer size. Another concern is tweaking the audience experience — finding ways to break down the traditional dynamic of performers onstage and ticket holders politely observing until they applaud at the end.
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The carnal heart pulsing within prison-bar ribs: Maddy Costa responds to Rachel Mars’ Our Carnal Hearts.
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With it's polemic political message, The Plough and the Stars has pulled back the myopic lense through which we usually watch theatre by giving us more to examine than other Boston premiers this year. This must have been what epic theatre felt like during Bertolt Brecht's time. 
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It's the tale of ordinary people being impacted by those extraordinary events, which is the genius of the playwright. His focus was not on the epic but on the everyday lives of those simple people.
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What makes this production compelling (I urge you to see it before these performers head off to complete the final stretches of their worldwide tour) is how O’Casey yanks us into his pitiless vision — at times subtly, sometimes grabbing our lapels – by exposing his characters’ aches, dreams, and, yes, their blood. 
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This immersive physical and aural experience leads audience via headset, on solo journeys that intersect.
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Obehi Janice talks about collaborating in theater, making her own career success and taking ahold of the character in We’re Gonna Die.
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Perhaps there’s something fitting about an irreverent take on Sean O’Casey’s classic of the Irish theater, “The Plough and the Stars.”
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