In the News

Farr's fusion of English legend and Shakespearean comedy is a pretty neat trick. And the set, by Gardarsson's Reykjavik-based colleague Börkur Jónsson, is a splendid mix of outsized greenery, creaking castle architecture, Alice in Wonderland whimsy, and funhouse obstacle course complete with pond. This production adds to the Christmas-panto story and droll, athletic shenanigans an infectious score played live by Connecticut-based roots band Poor Old Shine, with lyrics by the talented musicians and Farr. What it all adds up to, if not Errol Flynn or Ivanhoe, is a magical, rough-hewn delight.
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What a wonderful theatrical gift for the Holiday season.
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There may never have been a more purely entertaining production at the American Repertory Theater than “The Heart of Robin Hood.”
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It’s a romance, a comedy and a drama. It has swashbuckling, cross-dressing and acrobatics, a clarinet-playing mute and baddies straight out of “The Road Warrior.” There’s even an American roots band that looks like it wandered over from “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” or maybe just Davis Square. By the time of its final glorious romantic tableau, it will be a rare theatergoer who’s not won over.
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It is hard to come up with another American company whose creative footprint at the moment is making such a deep impression on the country’s theater. 
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For someone who claims he never really liked theater, Gisli Örn Gardarsson certainly knows how to turn a rehearsal room into a fabulous playground. Actors hang upside down from high ropes, performing feats not meant for the acrophobic. The Icelandic director is here re-creating his production of “The Heart of Robin Hood” at the American Repertory Theater, and he has a mischievous glint in his eye as he talks about elves and circus tricks and his unlikely affection for a certain crashing chandelier.
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Big news for the American Repertory Theater: The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation has announced a grant of $1 million to the Cambridge theater. The ART was one of five arts organizations nationwide to receive a grant designed to recognize innovation and help groups adapt to changing conditions.
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The fast-talking, wisecracking Wax knows the ins and outs of such hospitals. The child of Jewish immigrants who left Austria to escape the Nazis, she grew up in a suburb of Chicago. She says she was depressed as a child, but her condition went undiagnosed.
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What the current fascination for Lyndon Johnson says about Barack Obama’s America
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Star power? “All the Way” has plenty of it. Bryan Cranston will understand it’s a compliment to say the charisma on display is Lyndon Baines Johnson’s, not his.  
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