In the News

With it's polemic political message, The Plough and the Stars has pulled back the myopic lense through which we usually watch theatre by giving us more to examine than other Boston premiers this year. This must have been what epic theatre felt like during Bertolt Brecht's time. 
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It's the tale of ordinary people being impacted by those extraordinary events, which is the genius of the playwright. His focus was not on the epic but on the everyday lives of those simple people.
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What makes this production compelling (I urge you to see it before these performers head off to complete the final stretches of their worldwide tour) is how O’Casey yanks us into his pitiless vision — at times subtly, sometimes grabbing our lapels – by exposing his characters’ aches, dreams, and, yes, their blood. 
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This immersive physical and aural experience leads audience via headset, on solo journeys that intersect.
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Obehi Janice talks about collaborating in theater, making her own career success and taking ahold of the character in We’re Gonna Die.
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Perhaps there’s something fitting about an irreverent take on Sean O’Casey’s classic of the Irish theater, “The Plough and the Stars.”
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Kit tells his story through stylized slam poetry with intensity and honesty. Verbally the crafting of this fifty-minute piece is taut with rich imagery. 
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Anna Deavere Smith is a riveting veteran stage educator. Her latest and equally timely original theater text “Notes from the Field: Doing Time in Education”— seamlessly directed by Leonard Foglia at American Repertory Theatre—not only ranges as before back and forth between participants and observers in a documentary-like piece but also includes an intriguing interactive 25-minute middle section calling on audience members to listen to and teach each other through questions, answers and comments.
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Being born in 1974 versus 1984 made for big differences, as did geography, family, and community.
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In “Notes from the Field,” Smith has created a stunningly nuanced, inventive, and emotionally resonant investigation of how the country values the lives of young people of color.
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