In the News

In her mesmerizing theatrical shows, Ms. Lang has won critical acclaim for stepping into the skins of complicated veteran rock divas, like Nico of the Velvet Underground and the British rocker turned art singer Marianne Faithfull. Her newest show brings back Tammy Faye Starlite, a fictional character that made her a downtown New York club star more than a decade ago.
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At the heart of “Arrabal,” of course, is the tango, which threads together the story loosely told through dramatic movement, going forward in time then flashing back to the horrible years of the dictatorship. The dancing is gorgeous, robust and erotic, nothing short of marvelous.
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It is of course the dancing that matters most, and this is accomplished by a troupe that clearly knows what it is about. If this is the kind of experience you've enjoyed in previous dance pieces, you won't be disappointed.
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Like tango itself, the show intimately acquaints you with the most powerful emotions, from despair to sensuality. And it will make you want to undo buttons.
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Clad in a plaid shirt, black shorts and black boots, Ms. Gomez performs her show, which she wrote and which is directed by David Schweizer, as a sort of live movie script. (“Flashback. Interior. Doctor’s office.”) Her delivery is crisp, brisk and often deadpan, but her big, dark eyes gleam with intensity.
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New American Repertory Theater show explores the legacy of Argentina’s brutal military regime through music and dance.
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Arrabal, which the American Repertory Theater is bringing to the Loeb Drama Center for a five-week run, is a tango musical with a story to tell, and with a distinguished creative team.
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John Lithgow can’t get enough of the Boston arts scene.
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For over 40 years, John Weidman has been responsible for some of musical theater’s most complex and daring works. He has made a career out of writing the kind of theater that shatters expectations, revolutionizes structure, and stimulates the mind as much as the soul.
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Andy Warhol and Truman Capote were famously friends: The artist depicted the writer in his work several times, and the pair spent hundreds of hours in conversation (some of it published). Now pieces of those conversations will be adapted into “Warhol Capote,” a new play opening this September at the American Repertory Theater.
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