Menu

Close

OldNeighbors_wide.jpg
OldNeighbors_wide.jpg

The Old Neighborhood

Learn more:

This event has passed

The Old Neighborhood collects three tightly knit playlets in a quilt of remembered experience, as the characters, in middle age, revisit the stresses and strains of childhood. Mamet is clearly drawing on autobiographical sources in these plays, set in his old stomping grounds in and around Chicago, but his artistry is never merely biography. His genious for colloquial dialogue is abundantly clear as two old friends from a Jewish neighborhood reminisce about their childhood and the fate of their friends and neighbors; as a brother and sister painfully revisit their childhood; and as a sister’s wracked marriage and impending divorce is foreshadowed in their painful memories. A.R.T. audiences who remember Mamet’s The Cryptogram will recognize the same astute search for deep patterns in the rembered past.

SYNOPSIS

After an absence of many years, Bobby Gould returns to his hometown of Chicago. As his marriage flounders, he hopes to reconnect with his past to regain a sense of plychological equilibrium.

In The Disappearance of the Jews he reminisces with one of his best buddies from high school, but they argue over exactly what happened during their adolescent escapades. Struggling with the issue of monogamy, both men relish their early sexual encounters.

In Jolly Bobby and his sister discuss the traumatic experience of their parents’ divorce and the subsequent psychological problems they suffered. The anger they felt then explodes, but Jolly claims he has broken the cycle of emotional abuse.

In D. Bobby visits the first girl he loved, whom he left to seek happiness elsewhere. Like the other characters in the play, she, too, has struggled against a sense of bitterness and futility. But in her subtext, she suggests the possibility of growth and renewal.

Credits

Creative team

by

David Mamet

In addition to Boston Marriage, David Mamet is the author of the plays The Old Neighborhood, Oleanna, Glengarry Glen Ross (1984 Pulitzer Prize and New York Drama Critics Circle Award), American Buffalo, A Life In The Theater, Speed The Plow, Edmond Lakeboat, The Water Engine, The Woods, Sexual Perversity In Chicago, Reunion, and The Cryptogram (1995 Obie Award). His translations and adaptations include Red River by Pierre Laville, and The Cherry Orchard, Three Sisters, and Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov. His films include The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Verdict, The Untouchables, House Of Games (writer / director), Oleanna (writer / director), and Hoffa. Mr. Mamet is also the author of Warm and Cold, a book for children with drawings by Donald Sultan; Writing In Restaurants, Some Freaks and Make Believe Town, three volumes of essays; The Hero Pony, a book of poems; Three Children's Plays, On Directing Film, The Cabin, True And False, and the novel The Village.

View full biography

Directed by

Scott Zigler

Scott Zigler

Directed by

Scott Zigler

Director of the American Repertory Theater/Moscow Art Theatre School Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University. Founding member and past Artistic Director of New York’s Atlantic Theater Company and past Director of the Atlantic Theater Acting School, where he still serves as Senior Acting Teacher. Co-author of the widely used text A Practical Handbook for the Actor.  Mr. Zigler has taught acting at universities around the country as well as in Canada, Italy, and Australia.  Directing:  Broadway: The Old Neighborhood by David Mamet; Off-Broadway: Dust (World Premiere); Atlantic Theater Company: Premiere of Tom Donaghy’s adaptation of The Cherry Orchard; The Woods; Sure Thing; Strawberry Fields; Suburban News; As You Like It; National Tour: Oleanna; Regional: Phildelphia Theatre Company: Race; Steppenwolf Theatre Company: The Cryptogram; A Fair Country; American Repertory Theater: Romance; world premiere of Ellen McLaughlin’s Ajax in Iraq (ART Institute); Copenhagen; Animals and Plants; Absolution; The Cripple of Inishmaan; The Old Neighborhood (world premiere); Other Regional: Glengarry Glen Ross (McCarter Theatre); The Cryptogram (Alley Theatre); Spinning Into Butter (Repertory Theatre of St. Louis).

View full biography

Set design by

Kevin Rigdon

Set design by

Kevin Rigdon

Kevin Rigdon (Set Designer for The Old Neighborhood) designed lighting for the world premiere of Oleanna at the A.R.T. His Broadway credits include A Streetcar Named Desire, The Grapes of Wrath (Tony nomination), Our Town (Drama Desk nomination), Speed-The-Plow, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ghetto, and The Caretaker. In London he designed Orphans (West End), Speed-the-Plow, The Grapes of Wrath (Royal National Theatre). He is resident designer at Steppenwolf Theatre with more than 100 productions to his credit, and has also worked at many off-Broadway and resident theaters. Mr. Rigdon is the recipient of two American Theatre Wing Design Awards.

View full biography

Costume design by

Harriet Voyt

Costume design by

Harriet Voyt

Harriet Voyt (Costume Designer for The Old Neighborhood) designed costumes for the productions of The Cryptogram and Oleanna, both at the A.R.T. and in New York, as well as for the national tour of Oleanna. She attended the University of Maryland before embarking on a successful modeling career that spanned three continents over the course of a dozen years. Beginning with the prestigious Eileen Ford Modeling Agency in the 1970s, Miss Voyt achieved early success in Paris, Milan, and Tokyo while maintaining her base in New York City. She appeared in virtually all the major beauty and fashion magazines, both internationally and in the U.S., as well as in numerous commercial print and television ads for a host of national products.

View full biography

Lighting design by

John Ambrosone

Lighting design by

John Ambrosone

Lighting Designer John Ambrosone has designed over thirty productions for the American Repertory Theater, including Lysistrata, Absolution, Marat/Sade, Othello, Animals and Plants, Mother Courage (2001 Elliot Norton Design Award), The Doctor's Dilemma, Three Farces and a Funeral, Nocturne, IvanovThe Cripple of Inishmaan, The King Stag, Boston Marriage, Charlie in the House of Rue, Valparaiso, The Marriage of Bette and Boo, How I Learned to Drive, Nobody Dies on Friday, Man and Superman, The Old Neighborhood, When the World Was Green (A Chef's Fable), Alice in Bed, Slaughter City, and Buried Child. On Broadway he designed The Old Neighborhood. Work in resident theaters includes the Alley Theatre, Long Wharf Theatre, the Coconut Grove Playhouse, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Walnut Street Theatre, Trinity Repertory Company, and Arena Stage. Mr. Ambrosone also has designed in Singapore, Moscow, Japan, Brazil, Taiwan, Mexico, Germany, and France.

View full biography

The Disappearance of the Jews
Bobby Tony Shalhoub
Joey Vincent Guastaferro
Jolly
Bobby Tony Shalhoub
Jolly Brooke Adams
Carl Jack Willis
D.
Bobby Tony Shalhoub
A Woman Rebecca Pidgeon

 

set design by Kevin Rigdon
costume design by Harriet Voyt
lighting design by John Ambrosone
stage manager Tara M. Galvin